Italian seismologists convicted of manslaughter

Following the M6.3 L’Aquila earthquake in April of 2009, Italian seismologists and government officials were indicted for multiple accounts of manslaughter. The scientific community responded with widespread criticism.

The events leading up to the conviction, the conviction itself, and implications for the scientific and hazard-risk assessment communities was thoroughly summarized by Austin Elliot on his blog The Trembling Earth.

Please take some time to read his take on this event: http://tremblingearth.wordpress.com/2012/10/23/conviction-of-italian-seismologists-a-nuanced-warning/

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The future of great earthquakes

The above talk titled: “Great Earthquake Ruptures in the Age of Seismo-Geodesy” is given by Professor Thorne Lay of UC Santa Cruz. As an undergraduate freshman at UCSC, I took Thorne Lay’s intro GE course Earth Catastrophes. It was your generic GenEd course geared to students of all majors. My major was then undeclared.
Thorne Lay’s lecturing style greatly impressed me. I never missed a single lecture; they were always, engaging, insightful, and fun. By the end of my Freshman year I had declared as an Earth and Planetary Science major. Thorne Lay’s course had been pivotal in interesting me in geology.
He is one of the better lecturers I can think of and even if you do not study earthquakes or geology, it is very informative and enjoyable.
The lecture begins at 5 min.